Measuring equipment

The directional driller, whose job is to direct the well to the required target, obviously needs to know the exact angle and direction in which he is drilling. The data collected through the measurement-while-drilling (MWD) system is transmitted to the directional driller via the drilling fluid. That works as follows: by opening and closing a valve installed in the MWD and controlled by a mini-computer underground, so-called pressure pulses are generated in the fluid inside the drill string. A pressure sensor at the top of the string acts as a receiver for these pulses, which are evaluated by a computer and the results displayed on a screen. This information allows our drilling crew to react accordingly.

Measuring devices transmit drilling data to the surface

Pressure pulses convey information from ground level to underground

The directional driller, whose job is to direct the well to the required target, obviously needs to know the exact angle and direction in which he is drilling. The data collected through the measurement-while-drilling (MWD) system is transmitted to the directional driller via the drilling fluid. That works as follows: by opening and closing a valve installed in the MWD and controlled by a mini-computer underground, so-called pressure pulses are generated in the fluid inside the drill string. A pressure sensor at the top of the string acts as a receiver for these pulses, which are evaluated by a computer and the results displayed on a screen. This information allows our drilling crew to react accordingly.

The more data, the more on target the well

A state-of-the-art bottomhole assembly is also equipped with numerous sophisticated measuring devices that allow us to check with great accuracy whether we are drilling through the best possible rock formation (which is sometimes only a few metres thick). They measure the pore size, the distribution of pores in the rock, the permeability of the rock and the reservoir pressure. All this data indicates how well the oil or gas is flowing in a reservoir. Pressure and temperature are also measured at regular intervals. The more data we have, the more certain we can be that a well will reach its target formation and strike oil or gas.